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Compatibility Issue: Why Microsoft Finally Ditched Internet Explorer

Lismore (Australia): Tech giant Microsoft recently announced that it will shut down its long-standing web browser, Internet Explorer, and replace it with a new product, Microsoft Edge. Support for Internet Explorer will only last until June 15, 2022, so the rest of the users will only find an alternative for over a year. Of course, most Internet users already have one.

The final decline of Internet Explorer was seen as a natural conclusion for those who keep tabs on web trends, but for those who aren’t up to date, this news can come as a nasty surprise. Hmm.

However, in most cases the news is a whisper, not a footnote at the end of an iconic story spanning more than 25 years.

As a current expert in the computer industry, I will analyze some of the possible reasons for this decision and what you can take away from it.

Find the answer

Most people are used to the idea of ​​Google something, but they don’t do anything at Microsoft. How did Google become synonymous with web search? Hasn’t Microsoft become synonymous with its long and pioneering history?

The answer is market share. Google processes 92.24% of over 3.5 billion web searches per day. Bing, Microsoft’s own search engine, only accounts for 2.29%.

It’s clear why users prefer Chrome, Google’s own web browser, to Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, which uses Bing as its default search engine. Users who prefer Google search (almost all users) can make Google the default search engine for Internet Explorer. However, it would be easier to install Chrome and use Google from there.

Success creates complacency. Self-satisfaction causes failure

Microsoft hasn’t always been a bit of a gamer. In its early days, the web was a market pioneer. Before app stores, 5G, and even personal computers became mainstream, there were mainframe mainframe computers developed in the 1970s with a hard-to-use Unix operating system.

These systems had minimal functionality with little regard for graphics or usability. Netscape, the original Unix web browser, was just as simple.

This is where Microsoft stepped in and focused on personalizing personal computers. When Internet Explorer launched in 1995, Microsoft was firmly at the forefront of the digital world.

Read again: TO TEAR APART! Microsoft withdraws Internet Explorer

But as Benjamin E. Maze, an American Baptist minister and leader of the civil rights movement, warned, the tragedy of life is not in failure, but rather in complacency.

Microsoft, which built a reputation, stopped pushing the development of Internet Explorer and began to move elsewhere, continually improving Windows instead of web browsers. Since then, Internet Explorer has consistently lagged behind in introducing innovations such as tabbed browsing and search bars. It has become even more meaningless and obsolete.

Compatibility issues

One of my biggest complaints about spending a lot of my life as a web developer is the incompatibility of some web browsers. Spending hours tweaking a web page can be exhausting and overwhelming, but it doesn’t work well in some browsers.

This concern has also extended to internal Microsoft developers. In a 2019 blog post, “The Dangers of Using Internet Explorer as Your Default Browser,” Microsoft’s Chris Jackson warns:

(…) Modern developers have generally not tested Internet Explorer. They test with the latest browsers.

The message was clear: Web developers cannot take advantage of Internet Explorer, so sites that work well in other browsers may not work here, and the problem is only exacerbated.

Microsoft lost interest in keeping Internet Explorer on track, so it turned its attention to its new browser, Microsoft Edge. However, the horse can already be bolted. The market is flooded with Google’s Chrome, Apple’s Safari, Mozilla’s Firefox, and many open source browsers.

To call

There is another important statistic that shows the decline of Internet Explorer. By 2020, more than two-thirds of all website visits came from mobile devices.

Currently, we need a browser that can sync across multiple platforms. In the world of Apple and Android devices, the term Windows Phone sounds prehistoric. Support for the Windows Phone operating system ended in 2017, just seven years after Microsoft first launched the line.

As a result, Internet Explorer, which has been around since the dawn of the Internet age (or at least since the Internet really became mainstream), is lagging behind in many ways.

Read again: “Tarzan” actor Joe Lara kills six people in US plane crash

Despite the success of Surface tablets, Microsoft has failed to maintain its position in the smartphone market. Or vice versa. The awkwardness of Internet Explorer is the reason you don’t use Windows Phone.

But the bottom line is that Internet Explorer just doesn’t have the versatility for savvy web users. And from next year, even inexperienced users will not trust it.

Vin Buoy, Senior Lecturer at Southern Cross University (The Conversation)

Source Link Compatibility Issue: Why Microsoft Finally Ditched Internet Explorer


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Why Microsoft finally ditched Internet Explorer

Tech giant Microsoft recently announced that it will shut down its long-standing web browser, Internet Explorer, and replace it with a new product, Microsoft Edge. Support for Internet Explorer will only last until June 15, 2022, so the rest of the users will only find an alternative for over a year. Of course, most Internet users already have one.

The final downfall of Intbreaking puernet Explorer was taken for granted by those watching web trends, but for those who aren’t up to date, the news can come as a nasty surprise. ..

But most of the time, the news isn’t a story, it’s a whisper, and it’s the last footnote in an iconic 25-plus-year-old story.

As a current expert in the computer industry, I will analyze some of the possible reasons for this decision and what you can take away from it.

Finding the Answer Most people are used to the idea of ​​”Google” something, but not to “Microsoft” anything. How did Google become synonymous with web search? Hasn’t Microsoft become synonymous with its long and pioneering history? The answer is market share. Google processes 92.24% of web searches and processes over 3.5 billion requests per day. Bing, Microsoft’s own search engine, only accounts for 2.29%.

To re-read: Microsoft stops Internet Explorer in June 2022

It’s clear why users prefer Chrome, Google’s own web browser, to Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, which uses Bing as its default search engine. Users who prefer Google search (almost all users) can make Google the default search engine for Internet Explorer. However, it would be easier to install Chrome and use Google from there.

Success creates complacency. Satisfaction Causes Failure Microsoft hasn’t always been a bit playful. In its early days, the web was a market pioneer. Before app stores, 5G, and even personal computers became mainstream, there were mainframe mainframe computers with “incompatible” Unix-based operating systems developed in the 1970s.

These systems had minimal functionality with little regard for graphics or usability. Netscape, the original Unix web browser, was just as simple.

This is where Microsoft stepped in and focused on customizing “personal computers”. When Internet Explorer launched in 1995, Microsoft was firmly at the forefront of the digital world.

But, as Benjamin E. Maze, an American Baptist pastor and leader of the civil rights movement, warned, “the tragedy of life is not in failure, but rather in complacency.” It’s well known. Microsoft, which built a reputation, stopped pushing the development of Internet Explorer and began to move elsewhere, continually improving Windows instead of web browsers. Since then, Internet Explorer has consistently lagged behind in introducing innovations such as tabbed browsing and search bars. It has become even more meaningless and obsolete.

Compatibility Issues The incompatibility of certain web browsers is one of my biggest complaints about spending much of my life as a web developer. Spending hours tweaking a web page can be exhausting and overwhelming, but it doesn’t work well in some browsers.

This concern has also extended to internal Microsoft developers. In a 2019 blog post titled “The Dangers of Using Internet Explorer as Your Default Browser,” Microsoft’s Chris Jackson warned: They’re testing with the latest browsers.

The message was clear: Web developers can’t take advantage of Internet Explorer, so sites that work well in other browsers may not work here – and the problem is only getting worse.

Microsoft lost interest in keeping Internet Explorer on track, so it turned its attention to its new browser, Microsoft Edge. However, the horse can already be bolted. The market is flooded with Google’s Chrome, Apple’s Safari, Mozilla’s Firefox, and many open source browsers.

This is another important statistic for the decline of Internet Explorer. By 2020, more than two-thirds of all website visits came from mobile devices.

To re-read: RIP Internet Explorer – The web browser that started it all

Currently, we need a browser that can sync across multiple platforms. In the world of Apple and Android devices, the term “Windows Phone” sounds prehistoric. Support for the Windows Phone operating system ended in 2017, just seven years after Microsoft first launched the line.

As a result, Internet Explorer, which has been around since the dawn of the Internet age (or at least since the Internet really became mainstream), is lagging behind in many ways.

Despite the success of Surface tablets, Microsoft has failed to maintain its position in the smartphone market. Or vice versa. The awkwardness of Internet Explorer is the reason you don’t use Windows Phone.

But the bottom line is that Internet Explorer just doesn’t have the versatility for savvy web users. And from next year, even inexperienced users will not trust it.

(Vin Buoy, Senior Lecturer at Southern Cross University)


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Why Microsoft finally ditched Internet Explorer

Tech giant Microsoft recently announced the withdrawal of its long-standing web browser, Internet Explorer, in favor of its new product, Microsoft Edge. With support for Internet Explorer only scheduled until June 15, 2022, its remaining users have just over a year to find an alternative. But of course, most internet users already have.

While the eventual downfall of Intbreaking puernet Explorer was seen as inevitable by those watching web trends, the news could come as a nasty surprise to those a little less up to date.

For the most part, however, this news is a whimper rather than a bang – a footnote at the end of an iconic story spanning more than 25 years.

As a current professional in the IT industry, I will detail some possible reasons for this decision and what we can learn from it.

Searching for the Answer Almost everyone is familiar with the idea of ​​“Googleing” something, but there is no such thing as “microsofting” something. How did Google come to be synonymous with web search when Microsoft, despite its long and pioneering history, failed to become synonymous with nothing? The answer is market share. Google processes 92.24% of web searches, or more than 3.5 billion requests per day. Microsoft’s search engine, Bing, has a measly 2.29 percent.

Read also: Microsoft will withdraw Internet Explorer in June 2022

It’s easy to see why people prefer Google’s web browser, Chrome, over Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, which uses Bing as its default search engine. Users who prefer to search through Google (which is almost everyone) can make Google the default search engine in Internet Explorer. But it’s probably easier to install Chrome and use Google from there.

Success breeds complacency; complacency breeds failure Microsoft hasn’t always been a bit of a gamer. When the web was in its infancy, it was a market pioneer. Before there were application stores, or 5G, or even mainstream personal computers, there were mainframe computers with “incompatible” Unix-based operating systems developed in the 1970s.

These systems were about as simple as it gets, with little regard for graphics or usability. Unix’s original web browser, Netscape, was also no-frills.

This is where Microsoft stepped in, focusing on customizing “personal computers”. With much nicer designs and more intuitive user interfaces, by the time Internet Explorer launched in 1995, Microsoft had established itself at the forefront of the digital world.

But as famed American Baptist minister and civil rights leader Benjamin E. Mays warned, “The tragedy of life is often not in our failure, but rather in our complacency. Having established its reputation, Microsoft stopped pushing the development of Internet Explorer and began to venture elsewhere, continually improving Windows but not its web browser. From that point on, Internet Explorer has always lagged behind in introducing innovations like tabbed browsing and search bars. He fell further into uselessness and obsolescence.

Compatibility Issues Having spent much of my life as a web developer, one of my biggest gripes is the incompatibility of some web browsers. It’s exhausting and demoralizing to spend hours tweaking web pages, only so that they don’t perform well on some browsers.

This concern has even extended to Microsoft’s own internal developers. In a 2019 blog post titled “The Dangers of Using Internet Explorer as Your Default Browser,” Microsoft’s Chris Jackson warned: (…) developers, on the whole, just don’t test Internet Explorer these days. They test on modern browsers.

The message was clear: Web developers don’t get along well with Internet Explorer, so sites that work well on other browsers might not work here – and this problem will only get worse.

Microsoft having lost interest in keeping Internet Explorer up to date, it turned its attention to its new browser, Microsoft Edge. But the horse may have bolted already. The market is crowded with Google’s Chrome, Apple’s Safari, Mozilla’s Firefox, and many open source browsers.

Here’s another key statistic that illustrates the decline of Internet Explorer: In 2020, more than two-thirds of all website visits were made through a mobile device.

Also read: RIP Internet Explorer – the web browser that started it all

Now a browser capable of syncing across multiple platforms is a necessity. In a world of Apple and Android devices, the term “Windows phone” sounds prehistoric – because it pretty much is. Operating system support for Windows phones ended in 2017, just seven years after Microsoft launched the line.

So, having existed since the dawn of the Internet age (or at least since the Internet really became mainstream), Internet Explorer has failed in many ways to keep up.

Despite the success of its Surface tablets, Microsoft has failed to maintain itself in the smartphone market, which may explain its reluctance to continue developing Internet Explorer. Or maybe it’s the other way around, and Internet Explorer’s awkwardness is the reason no one uses a Windows Phone.

But the bottom line is that Internet Explorer just doesn’t have the versatility for savvy web users. And from next year, even unsuspecting users will also stop relying on it.

(Vinh Bui, Senior Lecturer, Southern Cross University)


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Explained: Why is Microsoft killing Internet Explorer, and what will its future Edge be?

Microsoft is goodbye to Internet Explorer after 26 long years. For a web browser that was once the market leader and then one of the holy trinities along with Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, this may seem like the end of an era. But the point is, Internet Explorer’s time has long since come.

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Earlier this week, Redmond-headquartered Microsoft announced it would end support for Internet Explorer 11 on June 15, 2022. In a blog post announcing the end of the journey for Internet Explorer, Microsoft has stated that Internet Explorer is less secure than modern browsers, and more importantly, does not provide an up-to-date browsing experience. Instead, the company wants users to use Edge, a modern web browser based on Google’s open source Chromium code, and to perform well on desktops and mobiles.

“We are announcing that the future of Internet Explorer on Windows 10 is in Microsoft Edge,” said Sean Lyndersay, Microsoft Program Manager for Edge. “Not only does Microsoft Edge offer a faster, more secure, and more modern browsing experience than Internet Explorer, but it is also able to address a key issue: compatibility with older and legacy websites and applications.

Explained: The Rise and Fall of Internet Explorer

It was the idea of ​​Microsoft founder and then CEO Bill Gates to dominate the browser market with the PC segment. In the 1990s, the world witnessed a growing Internet craze among the young and wealthy with the web browser as a gateway to the World Wide Web.

Development of the Internet Explorer project began a year ago before Microsoft rolled out the web browser in 1995. Thomas Reardon, known for launching the Internet Explorer browser, used the source code for Spyglass Mosaic, a licensed version of the NCSA’s Mosaic browser. It is said that a team of six people worked on Internet Explorer 1.0. Reardon was 24 when he started working on Internet Explorer.

Internet Explorer (IE) debuted in 1995 as part of the Windows 95 operating system and over time the number of users has increased. It was certainly not an instant hit given the dominance of the then popular Netscape browser with a 90 percent market share.

The first version of Internet Explorer lacked many features and by the time version 3.0 was released in 1996, the popularity of Microsoft’s flagship browser began to soar. It was also around this time that Microsoft moved away from Spyglass source code, which later resulted in a lawsuit for which the company had to pay $ 8 million.

The launch of IE 4.0 was a game-changer for Microsoft and its ambitions to dominate the web browsing market. IE 4.0 came free with the Windows operating system, a move that has proven to be crucial for the tech giant. The arrival of the free version of IE 5.0 in 1999 with Windows 98 enabled the company to reduce its market share of Netscape.

But the free bundling of Internet Explorer with the Windows operating system led to an antitrust lawsuit that began in May 1998 and lasted until June 2001. Microsoft was accused of its monopolistic behavior to control the market. In November 2001, Microsoft and the DOJ finally reached an agreement in which users would have the choice of choosing which web browser they wanted to use. In 2002, Internet Explorer crushed the competition with 95% market share.

While Internet Explorer will always be credited for the way we use the web, its downfall is a case study in itself. Internet Explorer 6 was riddled with bugs and security issues, which made it very unpopular. When Microsoft launched Internet Explorer 7 in 2006, the market for web browsers started to look very different.

The beginnings of Firefox in 2004 and Google Chrome in 2008, along with the rise of mobile operating systems such as Android and iOS, began to make Internet Explorer less relevant in the smartphone-dominated world. Microsoft’s inability to have a dominant mobile operating system (even though it did have Windows Phone, the mobile OS never being able to be tracked en masse), unlike Google and Apple, has not help Internet Explorer in the face of competition.

Over the years Internet Explorer has undergone several redesigns, but interest in Microsoft’s web browser has only waned as more people turn to Google’s Chrome, which both dominates both desktop and mobile platforms. Even to this day, Internet Explorer does not support extensions and there is no way to sync with other devices by default, which gives Chrome browser and Firefox an edge.

Internet Explorer’s 1.7% layoffs market share (as of March 2021) shows that Microsoft is right in its decision to unplug its once popular web browser. Internet Explorer 11, the last big update to Microsoft’s once-dominant web browser, was released in 2013 alongside Windows 8. However, development ceased in 2016 when all resources moved to a rival Microsoft Edge. from Google Chrome released the previous year.

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Microsoft Edge is the future

While the news of Internet Explorer’s demise may come as a shock to many, Microsoft has slowly made its popular web browser redundant. Microsoft ended Internet Explorer 11 support for the Microsoft Teams web app last year, and its 365 apps will stop working on the aging browser later this year.

Although it has put all its energy into making Edge the modern web browser, Microsoft has continued to provide the most widely used web browser with Windows. In fact, Internet Explorer even today comes preinstalled on Windows PCs with its Edge browser. Microsoft does not say when it will stop bundling Internet Explorer with Windows PCs.

For now, however, Windows 10’s Long Term Service Channel (LTSC) will still include Internet Explorer. Simply put, Internet Explorer is dead for all consumer versions of Windows 10. That said, the Chromium-based Edge browser has Internet Explorer (IE) mode, which Microsoft says is designed to ensure site compatibility and legacy applications based on IE.


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Why Microsoft finally ditched Internet Explorer after more than 25 years

Tech giant Microsoft recently announced the withdrawal of its long-standing web browser, Internet Explorer, in favor of its new product, Microsoft Edge. With support for Internet Explorer only scheduled until June 15, 2022, its remaining users have just over a year to find an alternative. But of course, most internet users already have.

While the eventual downfall of Internet Explorer was seen as inevitable by those watching web trends, the news could come as a nasty surprise to those a little less up to date.

For the most part, however, this news is a whimper rather than a bang – a footnote at the end of an iconic story spanning more than 25 years.

As a current professional in the IT industry, I will detail some possible reasons for this decision and what we can learn from it.

In search of the answer

Almost everyone is familiar with the idea of ​​”Googling” something, but there is no such thing as “microsofting” something. How did Google come to be synonymous with web search when Microsoft, despite its long and pioneering history, failed to become synonymous with nothing?

The answer is market share. Google processes 92.24% of web searches, or more than 3.5 billion requests per day. Microsoft’s search engine, Bing, posted a meager 2.29%.

Here’s why Google is synonymous with web search. Chart via StatCounter

It’s easy to see why people prefer Google’s web browser, Chrome, over Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, which uses Bing as its default search engine. Users who prefer to search through Google (which is almost everyone) can make Google the default search engine in Internet Explorer. But it’s probably easier to install Chrome and use Google from there.

Success breeds complacency; complacency breeds failure

Microsoft hasn’t always been a bit of a gamer. When the web was in its infancy, it was a market pioneer. Before there were application stores, or 5G, or even mainstream personal computers, there were mainframe computers with “incompatible” Unix-based operating systems developed in the 1970s.

These systems were about as simple as it gets, with little regard for graphics or usability. Unix’s original web browser, Netscape, was also no-frills.

This is where Microsoft stepped in, focusing on customizing “personal computers”. With much nicer designs and more intuitive user interfaces, by the time Internet Explorer launched in 1995, Microsoft had established itself at the forefront of the digital world.

1995 Internet Explorer Logo
You can almost hear the sound from the dial-up modem. Image via Wikimedia Commons

But as famed American Baptist minister and civil rights leader Benjamin E. Mays warned, “The tragedy of life is often not in our failure, but rather in our complacency.

Having established its reputation, Microsoft stopped pushing the development of Internet Explorer and began to venture elsewhere, continually improving Windows but not its web browser. From that point on, Internet Explorer has always lagged behind in introducing innovations like tabbed browsing and search bars. He fell further into uselessness and obsolescence.

Compatibility issues

Having spent much of my life as a web developer, one of my biggest gripes is the incompatibility of some web browsers. It’s exhausting and demoralizing to spend hours tweaking web pages, only so that they don’t perform well on some browsers.

This concern has even extended to Microsoft’s own internal developers. In a 2019 blog post titled “The Dangers of Using Internet Explorer as Your Default Browser,” Microsoft’s Chris Jackson warned:

[…] Developers just don’t test Internet Explorer these days. They test on modern browsers.

The message was clear: Web developers don’t get along well with Internet Explorer, so sites that work well on other browsers might not work here – and this problem will only get worse.

Microsoft having lost interest in keeping Internet Explorer up to date, it turned its attention to its new browser, Microsoft Edge. But the horse may have bolted already. The market is crowded with Google’s Chrome, Apple’s Safari, Mozilla’s Firefox, and many open source browsers.

By calling him

Here’s another key statistic that illustrates the decline of Internet Explorer: In 2020, more than two-thirds of all website visits were made through a mobile device.

Now a browser capable of syncing across multiple platforms is a necessity. In a world of Apple and Android devices, the term “Windows phone” sounds prehistoric – because it pretty much is. Operating system support for Windows phones ended in 2017, just seven years after Microsoft launched the line.

Hands using a tablet in front of a laptop
A browser that works seamlessly on a variety of devices is a must these days. Image via Taras Shypka / Unsplash, CC BY-SA

So, having existed since the dawn of the Internet age (or at least since the Internet really became mainstream), Internet Explorer has failed in many ways to keep up.

Despite the success of its Surface tablets, Microsoft has failed to maintain itself in the smartphone market, which may explain its reluctance to continue developing Internet Explorer. Or maybe it’s the other way around, and Internet Explorer’s awkwardness is the reason no one uses a Windows Phone.

But the bottom line is that Internet Explorer just doesn’t have the versatility for savvy web users. And from next year, even unsuspecting users will also stop relying on it.

This article by Vinh Bui, Senior Lecturer, Southern Cross University, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Did you know that we have a newsletter dedicated to consumer technology? It’s called Plugged In – and you can subscribe to it right here.



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Download and use the Tor browser on Windows 10

Madalina has been a Windows fan since she got her hands on her first Windows XP computer. She is interested in everything related to technology, especially emerging technologies – AI and DNA computing in … Read More



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Tor Browser is a tool that has been designed to preserve your online privacy by hiding who you are and where you are connecting from.

For people who might want privacy and the occasional anonymity, Tor Browser provides an efficient platform and an easy way to navigate the Tor network.

The Tor browser works by bouncing traffic around a global network of servers it calls “onion routers.”

In Onion Routing, thick layers of encryption make it impossible to trace messages to the point of origin.

This means that not only is your identity hidden from the sites you are trying to log into, but it is also impossible for anyone to intercept and read the communication along the way.

Due to its unprecedented levels of privacy, Tor Browser has garnered a large audience base and is used by people from different industries around the world.


Pair your Tor browser with the best VPN available. Find our top picks in this article.


Individuals use Tor to prevent websites from tracking them, businesses use Tor to protect sensitive provisioning models from prying eyes and perform competitive analysis.

Journalists use Tor to communicate effectively with whistleblowers, and the government uses Tor to ensure secure communications between diplomats.

The Tor browser keeps getting better and better and a new version 8.0.8 for Windows 10 is now available to further improve your anonymity while keeping your confidential information safe from prying eyes.


If you want to protect your internet privacy using regular browsers, it is safer to use a reliable VPN.
Install Cyberghost now (77% flash sale)
, a VPN market leader with enhanced security and unlimited bandwidth. It protects your PC from attacks while browsing, hides and manages your IP address and blocks all unwanted access.


Are you looking for a more modern browser?

Now, if Tor doesn’t have all the features you need, or you just don’t like the browser UI, here’s an alternative you can use.

Opera is a modern, fast, and privacy-focused browser that works great on Windows computers. The WindowsReport team uses it daily, and we wouldn’t switch browsers.

Opera

Opera

Opera is better known than tor and, thanks to the built-in VPN, offers almost the same level of security.

Here are 5 main reasons we love Opera so much:

  • There are no advertising or tracking scripts and third parties cannot collect user data to generate specific user profiles.
  • The browser comes with a built-in privacy-focused search engine, but you can use any search engine you want.
  • The built-in VPN fully encrypts your connection.
  • You can fully customize the browser (wallpaper, home screen, download pages included).
  • Files are downloaded much faster than other browsers.

So if you are curious to see what Opera has to offer, download it to your PC and give it a try.

You can read the original post below.


If you get the Tor Browser Secure Connection Failed error, check out this guide!


How to download and use the Tor browser

Tor Browser lets you use Tor on Windows, Linux, or Mac OS X without any difficulty. The browser is very portable as it can run from a USB stick and it is also preconfigured to protect your anonymity.

To download Tor, follow the steps outlined below.

  • Open a browser like Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, or Internet Explorer and navigate to Tor Project.

Make sure the URL is correct and don’t download from any other source. This will open the official Tor Project page and you’ll see a page that looks like the screenshot below.

  • You can either scroll down to the download section of Tor browser or click directly on the big download button.
  • Click on your operating system version (Windows 32/64 bit) and also select your preferred language. Then click to save the file.
  • Double-click to open the .exe file and run the program. A Tor Browser installation window will open asking if you want to run this file. Click “Run” and follow the installation instructions.
  • Click Finish and Tor Browser will complete the installation. Shortcuts will also be added to the desktop and the Start menu.

Use Tor browser

When you start Tor Browser, a window will open that allows you to adjust some settings. You can either choose to configure the settings immediately or go directly to the Tor network with the default settings by clicking the “Connect” button.

A new window with a green bar will open, indicating that you are connected to the Tor network.

For the first time, Tor Browser may take a little longer than usual, please be patient. It will open in 2-3 minutes and congratulate you.

In the upper left corner of Tor Browser, click the onion logo to access security and privacy settings. At this point, your browser will be ready to use. You can adjust the security settings according to your preferences.

If you want high level security that will keep all attackers away, you need to move the slider to the high level. While this protects you from all kinds of attackers that may interfere with your internet connection, it also renders some websites unusable.

For daily browsing with privacy protection, default low level security is suitable. But if you worry too much about sophisticated hackers, you can move the slider to a medium or high level.


Tor browser is already executing an error? We have the right solution for you.


The Tor browser works like any other browser, except that it hides your identity, making it difficult for people to know who you are and what you are doing online.

Have you already installed Tor Browser? If so, what are your experiences? Let us hear your opinions in the comments section below.


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